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Megillah, Daf Daled, Part 5

 

Introduction

In today’s section we continue to discuss which tannaim agree with the Mishnah which ruled that if Purim falls on Friday, towns and walled cities read on Friday.

 

מאי רבי יוסידתניא: חל להיות בערב שבתמוקפין וכפרים מקדימין ליום הכניסה, ועיירות גדולות קורין בו ביום.

רבי יוסי אומר: אין מוקפין קודמין לעיירות, אלא אלו ואלו קורין בו ביום.

 

What source is R. Yose? As it has been taught: If it falls on Friday, walled cities and villages push the reading forward to the day of gathering, and large towns read on the day itself.

R. Yose said: Walled cities do not read before towns, but both read on the day itself.

 

According to the first opinion, when Purim falls on Friday, the walled cities move their reading up from Shabbat (when the Megillah is never read) all the way to Thursday, the same day that the villagers read.

R. Yose objects that walled cities should never read before the towns. Therefore, they both read on Friday.

 

מאי טעמא דתנא קמא? דכתיב בכל שנה ושנה, מה כל שנה ושנה עיירות בארבעה עשר, וזמנו של זה לא זמנו של זהאף כאן עיירות בארבעה עשר, וזמנו של זה לא זמנו של זה.

 

What is the reason of the first opinion? Because it is written, "every year": just as every year towns read on the fourteenth and their time is not the same as the time of the walled cities, so here towns should read on the fourteenth and their time should not be the same as the time of the walled cities.

 

The first opinion holds that just as every year towns and walled cities have different days for reading, so too when Purim falls on Friday they should not read on the same day. To avoid reading on the same day, the walled cities move their reading to Thursday.

 

ואימא: בכל שנה ושנה, מה כל שנה ושנה אין מוקפין קודמין לעיירותאף כאן אין מוקפין קודמין לעיירות!

שאני הכא דלא אפשר.

 

But why not say: "Every year": just as in most years walled cities do not read before towns, so here walled cities should not read before towns?

This case is different, because it cannot be avoided.

 

This is the same difficulty we read in yesterday’s section. If the goal is to maintain the same pattern as other years, why not say that just as in other years walled cities do not read before towns, so too here they do not read before towns?

The answer is the same as before. There is no way for this year to be exactly the same as other years. Something has to budge.

 

מאי טעמא דרבי יוסיבכל שנה ושנה, מה כל שנה ושנה אין מוקפין קודמין לעיירותאף כאן אין מוקפין קודמין לעיירות.

ואימא: בכל שנה ושנה, מה כל שנה ושנה זמנו של זה לא זמנו של זהאף כאן זמנו של זה לא זמנו של זה! – שאני הכא דלא אפשר.

 

What is R. Yose’s reason?

[It says], "every year": just as every years walled cities do not read before towns, so too here walled cities should not read before towns.

But why not say: "Every year": just as every year the time of one is not the same as the time of the other, so here the time of one should not be the same as the time of the other?

Here the case is different, because it cannot be avoided.

 

This section is just the mirror image of above.

 

וסבר רבי עיירות לא דחינן ליום הכניסה? והתניא: חל להיות בשבתכפרים מקדימין ליום הכניסה, ועיירות גדולות קורין בערב שבת ומוקפות חומה למחר. רבי אומר: אומר אני, הואיל ונדחו עיירות ממקומןידחו ליום הכניסה! –

 

But did Rabbi really hold that towns should not shift their time to the day of gathering? Has it not been taught: If it falls on Shabbat, villages push the reading forward to the day of gathering, and large towns read on Friday and walled cities on Sunday.

Rabbi said: I say that, since the towns have to shift their time, they may as well shift it to the day of gathering?

 

In yesterday’s section Rabbi said that the towns should not have to shift their reading to the day of gathering when Purim fell on Friday.

But in the baraita quoted here, when Purim falls on Shabbat, the towns do shift their reading to Thursday, according to Rabbi.

Does Rabbi contradict himself?

הכי השתא? התםזמנם שבת היא, והואיל דנדחוידחו. והכא, זמנם ערב שבת.

 

How now! There, the proper time is Shabbat, and since they must shift they can shift [further]; but here the proper time is Friday.

 

The Talmud rejects the comparison. When Purim falls on Shabbat, the reading must be shifted. Once it is shifted, Rabbi says they shift it all the way to Thursday. But if the proper time is actually Friday, then Rabbi would say that we leave it on Friday.

כמאן אזלא הא דאמר רבי חלבו אמר רב הונא: פורים שחל להיות בשבת הכל נדחין ליום הכניסה.

הכל נדחין סלקא דעתך? והא איכא מוקפין דעבדי למחר!

אלא כל הנדחהידחה ליום הכניסה. כמאןכרבי.

 

Whose authority does R. Helbo in the name of R. Huna follow: If Purim falls on Shabbat, all shift their reading to the day of gathering?

All shift their reading, do you really think? But aren’t there the walled cities which read on the Sunday?

Rather [say]: All who shift [their readings] shifted to the day of gathering.

According to whom? According to Rabbi.

 

According to R. Helbo, if Purim falls on Shabbat, all places read on Thursday, the day of gathering. However, this is an impossible reading of his statement, since walled cities can read on Sunday the 15th, the same day they always read.

Therefore, the Talmud emends the statement to say that anyone who shifts their reading, shifts it to Thursday. This means that towns and villages both read on Thursday. This accords with Rabbi’s statement above.